On Fire
  • Jemima Wyman, 'Haze...', 2020, 124.5 x 183 cm, handcut digital photo collage. Courtesy of the artist, Milani Gallery, Brisbane, and Sullivan + Strumpf, Sydney.

  • Judy Watson, 'spot fires, our country is burning now' (detail), 2020, acrylic, pastel, graphite on canvas, 194 x 181 cm, Courtesy of the artist and Milani Gallery, Brisbane.

  • Michael Candy, 'Cryptid' (detail), 2019, robotic light sculpture, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and Michael Bugelli Gallery, Hobart. Photo: Tom Mesic.

  • Dale Harding, 'Untitled (still)', 2020–21, two channel digital video, Courtesy of the artist and Milani Gallery, Brisbane.

  • Kinly Grey, 'expanding bodies', 2019, installation view ‘Intimate Immensity’, Outer Space, Brisbane. Courtesy of the artist. Photo: Charlie Hillhouse.

  • Anne Wallace, 'Fire in the Hills', 2019, oil on linen, 61.4 x 92 cm. Collection of Philip Leeson and Lee Erickson, Canberra. Courtesy of the artist and Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney.

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On Fire

Climate and Crisis

30 January–20 March 202130 Jan–20 Mar 2021

#onfire

On Fire: Climate and Crisis profiles contemporary Queensland art in a time of significant ecological change. It situates this analysis during the emergence of what fire historian Stephen Pyne describes as the Pyrocene—the fire equivalent of an ice age, with Australia as one of its major epicentres.

One year on from Black Summer, the devastating 2019-20 bushfire season, the work of fifteen emerging, established, and posthumous artistic voices are presented here to frame an understanding of this theory of a new, incendiary era, and engage with closely related themes of global warming and climate threat in this state.

Queensland is synonymous with its climate, its identity and culture frequently foregrounded by it. This has previously been described ambivalently: part extreme, sweat-inducing, clime, yet also idyllic, even benign, paradise. This exhibition pronounces instead a changing image: of increasingly precarious conditions within the Pyrocene.

On Fire: Climate and Crisis looks to the past, present, and future terrain of this situation – considering the damaging legacies of colonialism, how artists visualise experiences of connection and disconnection with the environment, and fire’s capacity for rejuvenation in keeping with the burgeoning Indigenous cultural fire movement.

Artists

Gordon Bennett, Naomi Blacklock, Paul Bong, Hannah Brontë, Michael Candy, Kinly Grey, Dale Harding, Tracey Moffatt with Gary Hillberg, Erika Scott, Madonna Staunton, Anne Wallace, Judy Watson, Warraba Weatherall, Tintin Wulia, and Jemima Wyman

Curated By
  • Tim Riley Walsh
Artist Bios
Gordon Bennett

Gordon Bennett (1955–2014) was born in Monto, Queensland, and lived and worked in Brisbane, Queensland. Bennett’s work examines historical and contemporary constructions of personal and cultural identity. Bennett’s 30-year career saw him achieve significant national and international recognition. In 2012, Bennett’s work featured in dOCUMENTA (13), Kassel, Germany, and in 2014, the 8th Berlin Biennale, Berlin, Germany. Major solo exhibitions include Unfinished Business: The Art of Gordon Bennett, 2020 (Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art [QAGOMA], Brisbane); Gordon Bennett, 2007 (National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; QAGOMA, Brisbane; and Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth); and History and Memory in the Art of Gordon Bennett, 1999 (Brisbane City Gallery, Brisbane; Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, UK; Arnolfini Gallery, Bristol, UK; and Henie Onstad Kunstsenter, Oslo, Norway). Bennett’s work has been collected extensively and is represented in most major public art collections in Australia, as well as a number of significant international collections, including the Tate Modern, London. 

Naomi Blacklock

Naomi Blacklock (b. 1990) is a Brisbane-based artist whose practice maps the nexus of embodied performance, culture heritage and gender identity. Working across a range of media, from experimental sound installation, performance and sculpture, her work creatively examines the mythologies, archetypes and harmful histories of gender and cultural identity. Her ritualised sound objects and performances are intended to amplify the body and the voice through performative bodily precision and aural screaming. Blacklock’s work has been presented at Dark Mofo, Hobart; Museum of Brisbane, Brisbane; University of Queensland Art Museum, Brisbane; Firstdraft, Sydney; and Seventh Gallery, Melbourne. She is Co-Director of Boxcopy, Brisbane, and is a founding member of CLUTCH Collective.

Naomi Blacklock (b. 1990) is a Brisbane-based artist whose practice maps the nexus of embodied performance, culture heritage and gender identity. Working across a range of media, from experimental sound installation, performance and sculpture, her work creatively examines the mythologies, archetypes and harmful histories of gender and cultural identity. Her ritualised sound objects and performances are intended to amplify the body and the voice through performative bodily precision and aural screaming. Blacklock’s work has been presented at Dark Mofo, Hobart; Museum of Brisbane, Brisbane; University of Queensland Art Museum, Brisbane; Firstdraft, Sydney; and Seventh Gallery, Melbourne. She is Co-Director of Boxcopy, Brisbane, and is a founding member of CLUTCH Collective.

Naomi Blacklock
Paul Bong

Paul Bong (b. 1963) is a Cairns-based artist and a descendant of the Yidinji people, occupants of the rainforest country stretching from Cairns in the north to Babinda in the south and west into the Atherton Tablelands. Bong grew up around the Yattee area near Wright Creek in Far North Queensland. As a visual practitioner, Bong is driven to regain the stories and culture that were lost to European settlement and to share what was lost through his art. His grandmother, who spoke Yidiny, taught Bong stories and legends about the tropic Country. These stories are the inspiration for many of his artworks. Bong’s work is held in private and public collections, including the National Museum of Australia and Parliament House, Canberra. He has recently exhibited in Spoken, 2020 (State Library of Queensland, Brisbane); Megalo International Print Prize, 2020 (Megalo Gallery, Canberra); Artnow FNQ, 2019 (Cairns Art Gallery, Cairns); and Murrifactive Shield Studies, 2016 (FireWorks Gallery, Brisbane).

Hannah Brontë

Hannah Brontë’s (b. 1991) practice focuses on developing female and indigenous empowerment. Brontë is a Brisbane-based artist of Wakka Wakka, Yaegl, and Welsh ancestry. Her work traverses video, textiles, weaving, and photography, often drawing inspiration from the natural environment to conceive of speculative futures that centre Black and Brown women and their voices. Influenced by her love for rap, spoken word, and the power of protest, Brontë has exhibited nationally and internationally, including: NGV Triennial, 2020–21 (National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne)Tellus Terra, 2020 (Sydney Opera House); Transits and Returns, 2019 (Vancouver Art Gallery, Canada); The National: New Australian Art, 2019 (Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney); Perilous Bodies, 2019 (Ford Foundation, New York); Pataka—Revolutionary Women, 2019 (Porirua, Aotearoa, New Zealand); Next Matriarch, 2017 (ACE Open, Adelaide); Red Green Blue: A History of Australian Video Art, 2016 (Griffith University Art Museum, Brisbane).

Hannah Brontë’s (b. 1991) practice focuses on developing female and indigenous empowerment. Brontë is a Brisbane-based artist of Wakka Wakka, Yaegl, and Welsh ancestry. Her work traverses video, textiles, weaving, and photography, often drawing inspiration from the natural environment to conceive of speculative futures that centre Black and Brown women and their voices. Influenced by her love for rap, spoken word, and the power of protest, Brontë has exhibited nationally and internationally, including: NGV Triennial, 2020–21 (National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne)Tellus Terra, 2020 (Sydney Opera House); Transits and Returns, 2019 (Vancouver Art Gallery, Canada); The National: New Australian Art, 2019 (Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney); Perilous Bodies, 2019 (Ford Foundation, New York); Pataka—Revolutionary Women, 2019 (Porirua, Aotearoa, New Zealand); Next Matriarch, 2017 (ACE Open, Adelaide); Red Green Blue: A History of Australian Video Art, 2016 (Griffith University Art Museum, Brisbane).

Hannah Brontë
Michael Candy

Michael Candy (b. 1990) is a Gold Coast–based artist whose work utilises robotics, hardware hacking, intervention, and video. Candy’s practice explores the liminal realm that technology oppresses on the physical world. His installations and projects often emerge as social experiments or ecological interventions in public spaces. Recent exhibitions include the Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art: Monster Theatres, 2020 (Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide); Water, 2019 (Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane); and 1st Kathmandu Triennale, 2017 (Kathmandu, Nepal). Candy has exhibited broadly at Pratt Manhattan Gallery, New York City, USA; the Forum of Sensory Motion, Athens, Greece; the Instrument Builders Project + Hackteria Lab, Yogyakarta, Indonesia; and Hawapi, Huepetuhe, Peru. 

Kinly Grey

Kinly Grey (b. 1990) is a Meanjin (Brisbane)-based artist who works with light, smoke, metaphysics, and feeling. Their site-specific installations reimagine ways to understand the world through sensory experience and poetics. Working in galleries and public spaces, Grey has held solo exhibitions at Metro Arts, Outer Space, and Boxcopy, in Brisbane, and The Walls, Gold Coast. Their work has been featured widely, including at the Home of the Arts, Gold Coast; Brisbane Festival; Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane; Byron School of Arts, Mullumbimby; Queen Street Mall, Brisbane; Enoggera Reservoir, Brisbane; and Highgate Hill Park, Brisbane. Grey has also participated in public programs as an invited speaker at Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art and Griffith University Art Museum, Brisbane.

Kinly Grey (b. 1990) is a Meanjin (Brisbane)-based artist who works with light, smoke, metaphysics, and feeling. Their site-specific installations reimagine ways to understand the world through sensory experience and poetics. Working in galleries and public spaces, Grey has held solo exhibitions at Metro Arts, Outer Space, and Boxcopy, in Brisbane, and The Walls, Gold Coast. Their work has been featured widely, including at the Home of the Arts, Gold Coast; Brisbane Festival; Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane; Byron School of Arts, Mullumbimby; Queen Street Mall, Brisbane; Enoggera Reservoir, Brisbane; and Highgate Hill Park, Brisbane. Grey has also participated in public programs as an invited speaker at Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art and Griffith University Art Museum, Brisbane.

Kinly Grey
Dale Harding

Dale Harding (b. 1982) is a descendant of the Bidjara, Garingbal, and Ghungalu peoples of Central Queensland and a Brisbane-based artist. Harding works in a wide variety of media to explore the visual and social languages of his communities as cultural continuum, drawing upon and maintaining the spiritual and philosophical sensibilities of his cultural inheritance within the framework of contemporary art internationally. Harding’s work has been the subject of solo exhibitions at the Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne (2019); Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane (2019, 2015); and Milani Gallery, Brisbane (2016–19). Some recent group exhibitions include Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo (2020); PAC Milano, Milan (2019); Lyon Biennial, Lyon, France (2019); Sharjah Art Foundation, Sharjah, UAE (2019); Museum of Brisbane, Brisbane (2019); Tensta Konsthall, Stockholm (2018); Liverpool Biennial (2018); and TarraWarra Biennial (2018). His work can be found in private and public collections locally, nationally, and internationally. In July 2019 Harding was awarded a Doctorate of Visual Arts from Griffith University.

Tracey Moffatt

Tracey Moffatt (b. 1960) is one of Australia’s most renowned contemporary artists, working predominantly in photography and film for over three decades. Brisbane-born, Sydney-based Moffatt is a potent visual storyteller – the narrative of her work is often implied and self-referential, exploring her own childhood memories, and broader issues of race, gender, sexuality and identity. Moffatt has held over 100 solo exhibitions in Europe, the United States, and Australia; highlights include her solo presentation MY HORIZON, for the Australia Pavilion, 57th International Art Exhibition, Venice Biennale (2017); a retrospective film programme at the Museum of Modern Art, New York (2012); retrospective exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney (2003); and major solo presentations at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Brooklyn Museum (both 2007), and the Dia Center for the Arts, New York (1997-98). The artist’s work featured in the 47th Venice Biennale (1997), various Biennales of Sydney (2008, 2000, 1996, 1993), Sao Paulo (1998), and Gwangju (1995). In 2007, she received the prestigious Infinity Award for art photography at the International Center of Photography in New York. Moffatt’s short film Night Cries was selected for official competition at the Cannes Film Festival in 1990, and beDevil, her first feature film, in 1993.

Tracey Moffatt (b. 1960) is one of Australia’s most renowned contemporary artists, working predominantly in photography and film for over three decades. Brisbane-born, Sydney-based Moffatt is a potent visual storyteller – the narrative of her work is often implied and self-referential, exploring her own childhood memories, and broader issues of race, gender, sexuality and identity. Moffatt has held over 100 solo exhibitions in Europe, the United States, and Australia; highlights include her solo presentation MY HORIZON, for the Australia Pavilion, 57th International Art Exhibition, Venice Biennale (2017); a retrospective film programme at the Museum of Modern Art, New York (2012); retrospective exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney (2003); and major solo presentations at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Brooklyn Museum (both 2007), and the Dia Center for the Arts, New York (1997-98). The artist’s work featured in the 47th Venice Biennale (1997), various Biennales of Sydney (2008, 2000, 1996, 1993), Sao Paulo (1998), and Gwangju (1995). In 2007, she received the prestigious Infinity Award for art photography at the International Center of Photography in New York. Moffatt’s short film Night Cries was selected for official competition at the Cannes Film Festival in 1990, and beDevil, her first feature film, in 1993.

Tracey Moffatt
Erika Scott

Erika Scott (b. 1987) is a Brisbane-based artist who predominantly works in sculpture and installation. Scott’s visual language unfolds through a variety of media, often reassembling and modifying discarded household objects, furniture, and popular culture debris—resulting in a maximalist and often overwhelming DIY bricolage. The environments and constructions that Scott creates encourage an unsettling ambivalence, part attraction and repulsion, anxiety and relaxation. Her recent solo exhibitions include The Dutch Aquarium, 2020 (Outer Space, Brisbane); The Barnacle Lovers, 2017 (Wreckers ARI, Brisbane); and Pestorius Sweeney House Exhibition, 2016 (Pestorius Projects, Brisbane). Scott completed a Bachelor of Fine Arts (Honours) at Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane (2010). Scott is also the founding director of local ARI The Soylent Spot and the workshop and residency coordinator for Sculptors Queensland. 

Madonna Staunton

Madonna Staunton (1938–2019) was an artist and poet who lived and worked in Brisbane. Early in her life, Staunton was encouraged to make art by her mother, who was also a painter and poet of repute. From the mid-1970s, Staunton abandoned her initial focus on abstract painting and became known for works of collage, assemblage, and related media. In 2014, the Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art (QAGOMA) presented a retrospective of Staunton’s work, with a focus on her return to painting entitled Out of a Clear Blue Sky. Staunton’s work is held in major public and private collections, including the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney; Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth; Artbank, Sydney; Bendigo Art Gallery, Bendigo; Griffith University, Brisbane; University of Queensland Art Museum, Brisbane; Queensland University of Technology Art Museum, Brisbane; QAGOMA, Brisbane; and Parliament House, Canberra.

Madonna Staunton (1938–2019) was an artist and poet who lived and worked in Brisbane. Early in her life, Staunton was encouraged to make art by her mother, who was also a painter and poet of repute. From the mid-1970s, Staunton abandoned her initial focus on abstract painting and became known for works of collage, assemblage, and related media. In 2014, the Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art (QAGOMA) presented a retrospective of Staunton’s work, with a focus on her return to painting entitled Out of a Clear Blue Sky. Staunton’s work is held in major public and private collections, including the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney; Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth; Artbank, Sydney; Bendigo Art Gallery, Bendigo; Griffith University, Brisbane; University of Queensland Art Museum, Brisbane; Queensland University of Technology Art Museum, Brisbane; QAGOMA, Brisbane; and Parliament House, Canberra.

Madonna Staunton
Anne Wallace

Anne Wallace (b. 1970) is a Brisbane-born, Melbourne-based artist. Wallace studied painting at the Queensland University of Technology from 1988 to 1990, before travelling to the UK in 1994 to complete her Master of Arts at the Slade School, London, with the assistance of an Anne and Gordon Samstag International Visual Art Scholarship. Wallace’s painterly practice combines familiar and unfamiliar subject matter to reflect on the disquieting qualities of everyday life. Her work is in major public and private collections and has been exhibited widely, including the touring solo exhibition Strange Ways, 2020 (QUT Art Museum, Brisbane; Art Gallery of Ballarat; and Samstag Museum of Art, Adelaide); Know My Name—Australian Women Artists 1900 to Now, 2020 (National Gallery of Australia, Canberra); Plain Sight, 2019 (Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney); New Woman, 2019 (Museum of Brisbane); Anne Wallace: Recent Paintings, 2017 (Kalli Rolfe at Neon Parc, Melbourne); Narratives, 2016 (Greenaway Art Gallery, Adelaide); and Lurid Beauty, 2015 (National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne).

Judy Watson

Judy Watson (b. 1959) was born in Mundubbera, Queensland, and lives and works in Brisbane, Queensland. Watson’s Aboriginal matrilineal family are from Waanyi country in north-west Queensland. Her work reveals hidden stories within Country, working from site, archives and memory, uncovering Indigenous histories, following lines of emotional and physical topography that centre on particular places and moments in time. Recent major solo exhibitions include at Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, UK (2020) and the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney (2018–19). Watson’s work is held in significant private and public collections, including the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; all Australian state art galleries; Tate Modern, London; Taipei Fine Arts Museum, Taiwan; St Louis Art Museum, USA; British Museum, London, UK; Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of Cambridge, UK; Library of Congress, Washington, USA; and the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection, University of Virginia, USA. 

Judy Watson (b. 1959) was born in Mundubbera, Queensland, and lives and works in Brisbane, Queensland. Watson’s Aboriginal matrilineal family are from Waanyi country in north-west Queensland. Her work reveals hidden stories within Country, working from site, archives and memory, uncovering Indigenous histories, following lines of emotional and physical topography that centre on particular places and moments in time. Recent major solo exhibitions include at Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, UK (2020) and the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney (2018–19). Watson’s work is held in significant private and public collections, including the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; all Australian state art galleries; Tate Modern, London; Taipei Fine Arts Museum, Taiwan; St Louis Art Museum, USA; British Museum, London, UK; Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of Cambridge, UK; Library of Congress, Washington, USA; and the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection, University of Virginia, USA. 

Judy Watson
Warraba Weatherall

Warraba Weatherall (b. 1987) is a Brisbane-based installation and street artist from the Kamilaroi Nation of south-west Queensland. Weatherall has a specific interest in archival repositories and structures, and the life of cultural objects and histories within these environments. His practice critiques the legacies of colonisation, where social, economic, and political realities perpetually validate Eurocentric ideologies. Drawing on his personal experience and cultural knowledge, he uses image, material and metaphor to contribute to a cross-cultural dialogue by offering alternate ways of seeing and understanding. Weatherall has exhibited locally and nationally, including DATUM, 2019 (Milani Gallery Carpark, Brisbane); While You Were Sleeping, 2019 (aMBUSH Gallery, Australian National University, Canberra); InstitutionaLies, 2017 (Metro Arts, Brisbane); and National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Awards, 2017 (Museum and Art Gallery Northern Territory, Darwin).

Tintin Wulia

Tintin Wulia (b. 1972) is a Denpasar-born, Brisbane-based artist who has exhibited widely, including at the Istanbul Biennale (2005), Moscow Biennale (2011), Sharjah Biennale (2013), with works in significant collections worldwide including He Xiangning Art Gallery, Shenzhen, and Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven. Initially trained as a film composer and architectural engineer, Wulia works with video, installation, drawings, painting, sound, dance, text, performance and public interventions. Her interdisciplinary works – particularly on aspects of borders – are often participatory. Wulia represented Indonesia with a solo pavilion on atrocity and secrecy at the 57th Venice Biennale (2017). Her Smithsonian Artist Research Fellowship (2018) looked at mosquitoes. Since completing her PhD at RMIT, Melbourne (2014), Wulia has been an Australia Council for the Arts’ Creative Australia Fellow (2014–16) and Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Gothenburg (2018–20), where she is now Principal Investigator of the Swedish Research Council-funded Protocols of Killings: 1965, distance, and the ethics of future warfare (2021–23).

Tintin Wulia (b. 1972) is a Denpasar-born, Brisbane-based artist who has exhibited widely, including at the Istanbul Biennale (2005), Moscow Biennale (2011), Sharjah Biennale (2013), with works in significant collections worldwide including He Xiangning Art Gallery, Shenzhen, and Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven. Initially trained as a film composer and architectural engineer, Wulia works with video, installation, drawings, painting, sound, dance, text, performance and public interventions. Her interdisciplinary works – particularly on aspects of borders – are often participatory. Wulia represented Indonesia with a solo pavilion on atrocity and secrecy at the 57th Venice Biennale (2017). Her Smithsonian Artist Research Fellowship (2018) looked at mosquitoes. Since completing her PhD at RMIT, Melbourne (2014), Wulia has been an Australia Council for the Arts’ Creative Australia Fellow (2014–16) and Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Gothenburg (2018–20), where she is now Principal Investigator of the Swedish Research Council-funded Protocols of Killings: 1965, distance, and the ethics of future warfare (2021–23).

Tintin Wulia
Jemima Wyman

Jemima Wyman (b. 1977) is a Brisbane and Los Angeles–based artist whose practice encompasses performance, video, installation, photography and painting. Wyman’s work focuses on patterns and masking to investigate visual resistance: specifically camouflage as a formal, social and political strategy in negotiating identity. Wyman has exhibited widely in Australia and internationally. Recent solo exhibitions have been held at Sullivan+Strumpf, Sydney (2019, 2017); Commonwealth and Council, Los Angeles (2018, 2015) and Milani Gallery, Brisbane (2015). Wyman has participated in group exhibitions at Blackwood Gallery, University of Toronto, Canada (2020); TRANSFER, New York, USA (2019), HeK, Basel, Switzerland (2019), Chronus Art Center, Shanghai, China (2019); La Gaîté Lyrique, Paris, France (2019); ZKM, Germany (2018); and Wellington City Gallery, New Zealand (2018). Wyman’s work has been collected by the Whitney Museum, New York, USA; Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney; the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; and the 21st Century Museum of Art, Kanazawa, Japan.

Curator Bio

Tim Riley Walsh is a Brisbane-based curator and art historian. Riley Walsh is Australia Desk Editor for ArtAsiaPacific, Hong Kong, and a Post-Thesis Fellow within the School of Communication and Arts, University of Queensland. He is the Co-Editor of Gordon Bennett: Selected Writings (2020, Power Publications, Sydney, and Griffith University Art Museum, Brisbane) and has written widely for ArtAsiaPacific, Frieze, Art Monthly Australasia, Art + Australia, Eyeline, Apollo, Runway, and Artlink. Riley Walsh has previously worked in gallery management, communications, and programming roles at Milani Gallery, Brisbane; Camden Arts Centre, London; and the Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane.


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We acknowledge the Traditional Custodians of the lands where the IMA now stands. We pay our respect to Elders past, present, and emerging.

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